some emergent markets


Market Soundtrack by Daphne Lasky
July 26, 2010, 10:26 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

Sure, a picture is worth a thousand words…unless those words are, “Melon! 2 Euro/kilo! 2 Euro/kilo!” Click through the audio clips below to get a feel for the atmosphere at markets all around Paris. You’ll note that some are much noisier (more vibrant!) than others. If you listen closely, you can begin to tell which markets are full of gaps and lulls, when a market is empty and I’m able to walk quickly past vendors, and even when a market is crowded and I’m stuck by the tomato guy for a good 45 seconds.

Bastille

Brune

Crimee Curial

Edgar Quinet

Gros LaFontaine

Mortier

Popincourt–non-market day

Pyrenees

Reunion

Saint Charles

I’ll be annotating these clips over the next few days, so check back in for a more detailed analysis of the recordings.



woven market by jhuang
July 26, 2010, 10:08 am
Filed under: Paris | Tags: , , ,

Roving markets in Paris usually stand on their own [on medians, plazas or under metro tracks], but in case of the ones situated on the sidewalk, we’re noticing interaction with facing storefronts.  The extent varies, but at Point du Jour Market in the 16th arrondissemont, the market-side and the storefront sides of the market begin to merge into one.

Formal stall structures line only one side of the sidewalk while rogue vendors fill in the gaps in between stores on the other side.

PointDuJour_Panorama1

Soon, we begin to read the informal market umbrellas as an extension of store awnings.

PointDuJour_Panorama7

Stores also begin to set up their goods outside to take advantage of market day.
PointDuJour_Panorama4

PointDuJour_Panorama2

Finally, add the market goers and the two sides are woven together as one large market.



It’s Iconic by Daphne Lasky
July 21, 2010, 12:38 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

So much of our research has been focused on the nitty-gritty of Parisian markets (scaffolding, electrical outlets, bus stops and Metro signs), that a visitor to this blog could be excused for thinking that the city is entirely bereft of beautiful buildings and monuments. It’s time to correct this impression! Several of Paris’s markets take place in the shadow of the city’s most famous icons.

The Saxe-Bretuil market might be the most famous example of a food-shopping/icon-watching correlation. As you can see, in plan, the market is perfectly in line with the Eiffel Tower.

This doesn’t entirely bear out in person, however, as you can see from the photo below. Treetops block a bit of the view, and the busy market (those trucks, again) makes it difficult to find a spot to stand and admire it all.

The Bastille market is wonderful, but also full of tourists walking around looking for something to, well, storm. The monument in the middle of the traffic circle serves as a focal point at the entrance to the market, though it becomes less important as you walk further into the rows of market stalls.

The big surprise in all of this has been the market at the Square d’Anvers. Located Montmartre, the tiny market is sandwiched between apartment blocks, which in plan don’t seem all that promising. But! Montmartre is hilly, which opens up entirely new, non boulevard-/axis-related viewshed possibilities. Sacre Coeur is just up the hill from the square, and the view of it from the market is just lovely.



Mind the Gap by Daphne Lasky
July 21, 2010, 10:17 am
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: ,

The market structure here in Paris is remarkably linear. At markets like Belleville and Barbès, the space is so crowded that you can walk in a straight line for blocks before you find an opportunity to duck out into a different space.

On other occasions, we’ve come across markets with empty stalls. While the metal scaffolding is set up (thanks, city government!), an absent vendor creates a gap in the long stretch of produce-covered tables. Shoppers use these gaps as shortcuts for hopping from one row of stalls to another, and I’m starting to think of the empty stalls as potentially interesting field disturbances.

This gap opens up an interesting view across the market–it is so important to always be able to keep an eye on the cheese vendor.